I am at the airport. With the aid of Google’s location history tracking; my tracks over London in the past week and a bit.

I am at the airport. With the aid of Google’s location history tracking; my tracks over London in the past week and a bit.

Or rather, I was in the conservatory. Have you ever spent an hour drooling away valuable touristing time in a place with internet just waiting for something to properly upload, plunging away at the tubes of internet apps? I now have. 
Barbican, you’re lovely, but I’d wouldn’t want to be held up desperately wanting, and trying to coerce, my tiny recorded presence into existence anywhere. (Which reminds me that backlog of things I’ve long felt a need to journal down is weighing down all new thoughts. Welp. Shift those.)

Or rather, I was in the conservatory. Have you ever spent an hour drooling away valuable touristing time in a place with internet just waiting for something to properly upload, plunging away at the tubes of internet apps? I now have.
Barbican, you’re lovely, but I’d wouldn’t want to be held up desperately wanting, and trying to coerce, my tiny recorded presence into existence anywhere. (Which reminds me that backlog of things I’ve long felt a need to journal down is weighing down all new thoughts. Welp. Shift those.)

I post that in part because I’m actually in the Barbican Conservatory now, with the generous help of another dad-sponsored holiday.
It is a delightful place (open on public on Sundays, closed at 5). Here glum looking fish swim in a pond set amidst tile and glass and concrete and I love it.

Are they piranhas, a tiny child in a nearby group wondered. (They’ll rip you into a million pieces, she elaborated.)

From Bishan bus interchange about 2 months ago; I loved the magnificently stark yet refined looks. (Actually, I’m not sure precisely why it appeals, but it probably has something to do with old memories of concrete and cloudy skies filtered through dreams.)

It might’ve reminded me of another place that left a good first impression - the Barbican Centre.

meet-me-in-europe:

Gjógv, Faroe Islands


I love seeing otherwise regular and cosy suburbs happily sprouted in these geographical extremities.

meet-me-in-europe:

Gjógv, Faroe Islands

I love seeing otherwise regular and cosy suburbs happily sprouted in these geographical extremities.

(via othernotebooksareavailable)

overly warm afternoon with matching cat

natgeofound:

Locals enjoy the view of the Surrey Hills in England, 1928.Photograph by Clifton R. Adams, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Locals enjoy the view of the Surrey Hills in England, 1928.Photograph by Clifton R. Adams, National Geographic

I tend to be a bit cautious about dabbing on filters now standard fare in most mobile cameras; probably in part due to never having used Instagram, there’s
1) gosh this thrill of delight must be so 5 years and a million pictures ago for most people
2) backed up by an instinctive remnant, desperate snobbery, inherited in part from some old version of me seeing people both constantly using and cynically dismissing those cheap, one-tap-away filters

Nevertheless one must gently push back cynicism also this rainy bus trip looks entirely dreamy insta-filtered.

art-is-art-is-art:

Rainy Day in Vomero, Naples, Attilio Pratella

art-is-art-is-art:

Rainy Day in Vomero, Naples, Attilio Pratella

(via arcadiainteriorana)

majozaur:

Allium by takmaj
blastedheath:

Jeffrey Smart (Australian, 1921-2013), The Steps, 1967. Oil on canvas, 76 x 80 cm.

blastedheath:

Jeffrey Smart (Australian, 1921-2013), The Steps, 1967. Oil on canvas, 76 x 80 cm.

S. follows blue signs through wide, luminous aisles. Shortcut to Home Organization. To Bookcases, Media & Storage. Each, it seems, leads him deeper into this sprawling furniture labyrinth.

He wonders how long ago he pulled into that immense parking lot with vague intentions of buying a few things for his apartment: a side table, a reading lamp, a shower mat. Four hours, eight hours, twelve? An unpleasant realization solidifies in S.’s mind: he’s lost, lost in Furniture Land.

Pair with: “Life in IKEA is impossible

Pretty cloud

Pretty cloud

massarrah:

List of Plants in a Royal Babylonian Garden

This tablet lists plants in the garden of the Babylonian king Marduk-apla-iddina (reigned 721-710 and in 703 BCE; Biblical Merodach-Baladan). Included on the list are various vegetables, such as onion and leek, and herbs, such as mint and coriander. (Source)

Neo-Babylonian, c. 8th-7th century BCE.

British Museum.

(via ancient-mesopotamia)

pair with